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American Association of Plastic Surgeons

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Risk Factors And Complications In Male Aesthetic Surgery: A Multi-institutional Analysis
Jacquelynn P. Tran, MD1, Robert P. Duggan, BS1, Stefanos Boukovalas, MD2, Linda G. Phillips, MD1.
1University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, 2University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

PURPOSE: Gender-based discrepancies in surgical outcomes are well documented in medicine; however, there is a paucity of data within the plastic surgery literature. The purpose of this study is to assess risk factors associated with aesthetic surgery in men and compare complication profiles between genders.METHODS: All patients who underwent aesthetic surgery between 2009-2014 were identified from Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons (TOPS) database. Primary outcome was to identify complications rates based on gender. Regression analyses were used to characterize all reported patient variables. RESULTS: 41,633 patients were included, 5,451 males and 40,682 females. Males were significantly younger, had higher mean BMI, percentage of tobacco use and diabetes. Overall complication rate between males and females did not differ significantly. However, the number of major complications, defined as unplanned ER visit, readmission, or reoperation within 30 days were higher in men(p=0.006). Male gender was found to be an independent risk factor for hematoma(OR2.7,p=0.001) and reoperation(OR1.8,p<0.001). In males regardless of procedure performed, obesity was associated with an adverse event (OR3.6,p=0.04); combining procedures were associated with seroma(OR1.9, p<0.001), major complication(OR3.2,p<0.001) and hematoma(OR2.9,p=0.02). CONCLUSION: This is one of the first multi-institutional studies to benchmark surgical outcomes in male aesthetic surgery. This study highlights the importance of preoperative counseling as male gender is an independent risk factor for hematoma and reoperation. It is anticipated that number of men seeking plastic surgery will continue to rise with the rise in transgender care; understanding the male risk profile will be crucial to optimizing future outcomes.


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