AAPS Main Site
Annual Meeting Home
Final Program
Past & Future Meetings


Back to 2015 Annual Meeting Program


A Retrospective Review of the Outcomes of Migraine Surgery in the Adolescent Population
Bahman Guyuron, MD, Kyle Lineberry, MD, Eddie Nahabet, BS.
Case Western Reserve - University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH, USA.

PURPOSE: Migraine surgery has been extensively studied in adult patients with refractory headaches. The purpose of this study was to review a single surgeon’s outcomes following migraine surgery in an adolescent population
METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients operated on by the senior author from 2000 to 2014 was performed. All patients 18 years old or younger with at least one year of follow up after surgery were included. Pre- and post-operative migraine frequency, duration, severity and migraine headache days and index were analyzed for statistical significance.
RESULTS: A total of 14 patients and 15 surgeries were analyzed. The frequency of migraine headaches reduced from 25 to 5 in 30 days (p < 0.0001) the migraine headache index decreased from 148.1 to 12.4 (p < 0.0001) the duration of headaches (number of hours/24 hour) declined from 0.71 to 0.25 (p= 0.002), severity of headaches diminished from 8.2 to 4.3 (p= 0.0004), and migraine days per month declined from 25 to 5 (p< 0.0001). Five patients remained free of any symptoms following surgery. One patient had no improvement in frequency of headaches, but did have improvement in severity and duration of headaches. The average follow up period was 38.2 months. No postoperative complications were noted on this group of patients.
CONCLUSION: In the adolescent population with migraine headaches refractory to traditional medical management, migraine surgery may offer symptomatic improvement of migraine headache frequency, duration and severity in patients with identifiable anatomic trigger sites.


Back to 2015 Annual Meeting Program